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Oklahoma Proposed Designs

Winning design chosen for the Oklahoma quarter

Winning Oklahoma Quarter design - scissor-tailed flycatcher and the Gaillardia pulchella plant
Hi-Res version (415kb)

Other finalist designs by The Mint for the Oklahoma quarter

The 5 design narratives submitted to the Mint

Finalist #3 - A tilted three-dimensional shape of the state of Oklahoma is in the middle of the coin. On the east side of the state is an old-fashioned gushing oil derrick representing prosperity and the enduring impact of the state's oil and gas industry. On the west side of the state is a rendering inspired by the Pioneer Woman. A celebrated statue in Ponca City, the Pioneer Woman honors the courage, tenacity and ingenuity of those who endured great hardships to build their dreams. Along the edges of the coin are shocks of wheat to represent the state's vibrant agriculture industry, a vital part of both our economy and heritage.

Draft drawing for Finalist #3
Finalist #4 - A three-dimensional shape of the state of Oklahoma is centered on the coin. The primary image, in the middle of the state, is a likeness of the Pioneer Woman, a celebrated statue in Ponca City that honors the courage, tenacity and ingenuity of those who weathered hardships to realize their dreams. Behind the Pioneer Woman and child is a traditional calumet that cuts across the state, essentially dissecting it. Also known as an American Indian "peace pipe," the calumet is a ceremonial pipe used by many tribes; it symbolizes the tremendous influence of American Indian culture in Oklahoma, as well as the renowned friendliness and openness of Oklahomans. Draft drawing for Finalist #4
Finalist #5 - This design celebrates the people and industries that have shaped Oklahoma. A small three-dimensional outline of Oklahoma occupies the top left of the coin. Rays radiate from behind the state outline to illuminate other objects pictured below and to the left: a gushing oil derrick to reflect Oklahoma's prosperity and oil and gas industry; an American Indian calumet, also known as a "peace pipe," to represent Oklahoma friendliness and the strong influence of Native American culture; a shock of wheat to symbolize the importance of agriculture in the state; and an image inspired by the Pioneer Woman, a celebrated Ponca City statue that honors the courage, tenacity and ingenuity of those who endured hardships to achieve their dreams. Draft drawing for Finalist #5
Finalist #6 - The coin features a blanket of Oklahoma's state wildflower, Indian blanket, or Gaillardia, saluting the state's Native American heritage and native long grass prairies. Like the people of Oklahoma, the Indian blanket is hardy and resilient, thriving in a variety of conditions and blooming with fiery color throughout Oklahoma's sunny summers. This design boasts several Indian blanket blooms in the foreground, backed by a field of similar wildflowers. Above the field is the Oklahoma state bird, the scissortail flycatcher, in flight with tail feathers spread. Draft drawing for Finalist #6
Finalist #10 - On the left-hand side of the coin is an old-fashioned windmill, balanced on the right by a gushing oil derrick. Taken together, these illustrations represent agriculture and oil and gas innovations, both of which greatly influenced development of Oklahoma. In the middle of the coin is an illustration of waving wheat along with a figure inspired by the Pioneer Woman, a Ponca City statue representing the courage, tenacity and ingenuity of the pioneers who endured hardships to realize their dreams. Draft drawing for Finalist #10


Other finalists proposed, but not submitted

Finalist #1 - Centered on the coin is a simple, three-dimensional rendering of the shape of Oklahoma with 46 stars, signifying the state as the 46th state to join the United States. Draft drawing for Finalist #1
Finalist #2 - A three-dimensional shape of the state of Oklahoma is centered on the coin. Overlaying the center of the state is an old-fashioned gushing oil derrick, symbolizing prosperity and the enduring impact of the oil and gas industry in Oklahoma. Also on the coin are 46 stars, signifying the state as the 46th to join the United States. Draft drawing for Finalist #2
Finalist #7 - Oklahoma's state bird, the scissortail flycatcher, reflects the distinctiveness and energy of Oklahoma. One of the most elegant and unusual birds in flight, the scissortail flycatcher is truly unique to this part of the country. A depiction of the bird in flight conveys Oklahoma's vitality and the soaring promise of a state rich in people and natural resources. On the coin, the scissortail flycatcher is centered in flight with tail feathers spread over a three-dimensional outline of Oklahoma. Draft drawing for Finalist #7
Finalist #8 - Centered in the background on the coin is an incuse outline of the state of Oklahoma. The principal images overlaying the outline are of an American Indian woman and a male pioneer shaking hands, both figures in traditional dress. The handshake is centered in the middle of the coin, the illustration symbolizing when Oklahoma became a state. Draft drawing for Finalist #8
Finalist #9 - On the right part of the coin is a tilted outline of Oklahoma. On the left, overlapping the outline of the state, is a side view of an American Indian woman in traditional dress, a cradle board and baby on her back. The figures represent the significant influence that Native American culture has had on Oklahoma. Draft drawing for Finalist #9

One early design proposed that was not a finalist

James Earle Fraser-The End Of The Trail from Victor Easley

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